Selma Blair’s severe MS

This shows you actress Selma Blair with multiple sclerosis which has distorted her voice. https://youtu.be/hsJOqH5BR3E

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Mononucleosis Is Linked to Multiple Sclerosis

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Mononucleosis, the “kissing disease” has been recently linked to lupus, multiple sclerosis, diabetes (type I), inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. These were added to the list of diseases mononucleosis is related to. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180416121606.htm

Mononucleosis is caused by the Epstein Barr Virus (EPV). This virus is in the saliva. Over ninety percent of people in advanced countries have the virus by age 20.
Poor countries typically have ninety percent of their population infected by the age of two.

It is usually no big deal in most cases–the person feels tired for two weeks and the recovers: however, serious cases can last for months. The illustration above predicts the associated symptoms.

It is my and others belief that major disturbance of the immune system makes getting multiple sclerosis more likely. People who live in cold climates, who have more exposure to colds, flus, and mononucleosis, are more likely to get MS. I believe repeated assaults on the immune system makes autoimmune diseases, like those above, more likely.

See how I dealt with MS at:

Adverse Childhood Experiences Shorten Life

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There is now compelling evidence that adverse circumstances can significantly shorten a child’s life.  Adverse events such as child physical, sexual, and emotional abuse make the child as an adult more susceptible to chronic illness.  I stated this in my book, “Multiple Sclerosis Mission Remission: Healing MS Against All Odds.”  It is nice to see supporting information at

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-last-best-cure/201508/7-ways-childhood-adversity-can-change-your-brain

The pain of a MS dysphonia flareup

Actress Selma Blair describes the many years it took for her multiple sclerosis to be diagnosed in this interview:
https://www.goodmorningamerica.com/wellness/story/selma-blair-shares-candid-details-life-ms-multiple-61352124
She needs prednisolone infusions for the flare up. If I were her, I would use the once every six months infusion of Ocrevus. In any case, she should consult with her doctors regarding either of these possibilities as each case has its own unique features. She could avoid reinventing the wheel by reading my book “Multiple Sclerosis Mission Remission: Healing MS Against All Odds” which is available on amazon and is described at http://www.msmissionremission.com

Vitamin D Mania!
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Post 17: when getting your D is good

Neurologists are seeing the light regarding the importance of vitamins. I always took about 400 units of vitamin D. My neurologist recently recommended that I increase it to 20,000 units. They are getting research results implicating low levels of vitamin D with increased risk for multiple sclerosis. And beyond that, as noted in the chart above, low levels of vitamin D may play a role in many diseases.

See helpful healing to chronic disease described in my book “Multiple Sclerosis Mission Remission: Healing MS Against All Odds” available at amazon.com.

Availble as an audiobook

Multiple Sclerosis Mission Remission is also an audiobook at https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B07KFQD9DV/ref=tmm_aud_title_0?ie=UTF8&qid=&sr=

Multiple Sclerosis Mission Remission is now also available as an audiobook!

“Multiple Sclerosis Mission Remission” is available as an audiobook at:
https://bookmate.com/audiobooks/ZWaotJbv?dscvr=top_result

Resilience is needed to cope with chronic illness

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My wife, Deborah Brogan, MD, was a board certified psychiatrist. We were married when she was 28 years old. She was not expected to live beyond the age of 40. She lived to be 61 years old and did private practice until she was 58 years old. She also worked at Arizona State University on their eating disorders team for 22 years after we were married. Prior to all of this, she worked at Albany County mental health clinic in albany, New York for 3 years. Prior to this, she spent seven years with medical school and a psychiatric residency.

She had severe juvenile diabetes since she was 12 years old. In 1998, 19 years before death in 2017, she had a kidney-pancreas transplant which was necessary because of the diabetes. She was hospitalized about 30 times, and continued working in between hospitalizations.

She was fond of the above “Elements of Resilience” and incorporated it into psychotherapy with her patients in private practice. It is good guidance in what to strive for to meet the challenges of life. It is a good summary of what helps me to cope with multiple sclerosis. It is the spirit I try to convey in my book, “Multiple Sclerosis Mission Remission: Healing MS Against All Odds” at

Eggs, legumes, vegetables, fish and chicken in preventing and/or helping multiple sclerosis

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https://m.medicalxpress.com/news/2018-08-diets-high-vegetables-fish-multiple.html

Curtain University found th as t eating fish and vegetables may be less likely to contract multiple sclerosis. Specifically, legumes, fish, vegetables, poultry and egg consumption correlated with less risk of getting MS.

Smoking, glandular fevers, getting less sun, and low vitamin D intake are known to be associated with increased risk of contracting multiple sclerosis.

The Australian study studied the difference between a healthy diet consisting of the above healthy foods and a tragically flawed Western diet (which typically includes too much sugar and fat).

The study’s author, Dr. Black concluded that people eating a high amount of these healthy foods, like fish and vegetables, were fifty percent less likely to contract multiple sclerosis than people who ate a low amount of these foods.

The reference for this study is:
Lucinda J Black et al. A healthy dietary pattern associates with a lower risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination, Multiple Sclerosis Journal (2018). DOI: 10.1177/1352458518793524

Read about my miracle MS remission at

500 medicines being developed for neurological conditions

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100 million people in the United States, or nearly a third of people in the United States, suffer from a neurological condition of which multiple sclerosis is one. Alzheimers, Parkinsons, dementia, ALS, brain tumors and conditions, traumatic brain injuries, migraine headaches, MS, chronic pain, stroke damage, genetic disorders, and epilepsy are among the thousand neurological conditions counted.

Over 500 new medications are in pharmaceutical companies drug development pipelines to treat neurological problems. Over seventy percent represent a brand new or “first in class” treatment approach.

In multiple sclerosis, the new candidate focuses on myelin repair. Myelin covers nerve fibers and is like insulation that allows the nerve signal to travel faster without interruption. It would help new myelin to grow to repair damaged nerve fibers.

There is nothing like this now, as the major MS medications are focused on preventing the immune system from mistakenly attacking the myelin protective sheath over the nerve fibers. These misguided attacks on the nerve fibers and brain neurons are why MS is considered to be an autoimmune disease.

Many of the alternative, spiritual, exercise, and healthy living approaches described in my book could help many people battling with chronic disease. See
https://www.amazon.com/Multiple-Sclerosis-Mission-Remission-Healing-ebook/dp/B07D7JBZ5L/ref=mp_s_a_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1529367853&sr=8-2&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65&keywords=multiple+sclerosis+Mission+remission