Stem Cell treatment for multiple sclerosis

science
MS Post 12: We have come a long way, baby!

Stem cell treatments for multiple sclerosis is one of the newer success stories. See https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/28621766/

Findings are that autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation will completely suppress MS disease activity for four or five years in seventy to eighty percent of people completing the procedure. That’s the good news.

The less fortunate news is that it works best on young ambulatory MS patients who have inflammatory activity going on in their brains, i.e. the multiple sclerosis is more active. So that probably rules me out.

Prior to 2005, there was a 3.6 percent mortality associated with this complex procedure. After 2005, the mortality was greatly reduced to only 0.3 percent.

I am older and very ambulatory with no inflammatory lesions or disease activity going on in my brain so I am probably not the best candidate for what sounds like an arduous procedure. I have achieved total remission with the help of a combination of different medical drugs with many healthy, alternative, and spiritual practices described in my book at

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The effect of heat on multiple sclerosis, MS

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Post 11: When MS is hot, you are not well 

For myself, I live in Phoenix, Arizona where temperatures in the summer are almost always over a 100゚F.  During the hot summer months, the temperature in my closed garage is around a 120 ゚F or more.  I used to feel like somebody wound up and punched me when getting out  of my car when my multiple sclerosis was active. Since my MS went into remission about ten years ago, The heat doesn’t affect me nearly as much.

Myelin helps nerve impulses travel faster down your nerve fibers. It is like the insulation covering an electrical cord. Because multiple sclerosis damages the myelin, the insulation covering your nerve fibers, the impulses travel slower. The damaged nerve fibers are especially susceptible to heat, and then conduct impulses even slower when it is hot for the person who has MS.

Read the story of the many things I did to go into remission from MS at

Eggs, legumes, vegetables, fish and chicken in preventing and/or helping multiple sclerosis

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https://m.medicalxpress.com/news/2018-08-diets-high-vegetables-fish-multiple.html

Curtain University found th as t eating fish and vegetables may be less likely to contract multiple sclerosis. Specifically, legumes, fish, vegetables, poultry and egg consumption correlated with less risk of getting MS.

Smoking, glandular fevers, getting less sun, and low vitamin D intake are known to be associated with increased risk of contracting multiple sclerosis.

The Australian study studied the difference between a healthy diet consisting of the above healthy foods and a tragically flawed Western diet (which typically includes too much sugar and fat).

The study’s author, Dr. Black concluded that people eating a high amount of these healthy foods, like fish and vegetables, were fifty percent less likely to contract multiple sclerosis than people who ate a low amount of these foods.

The reference for this study is:
Lucinda J Black et al. A healthy dietary pattern associates with a lower risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination, Multiple Sclerosis Journal (2018). DOI: 10.1177/1352458518793524

Read about my miracle MS remission at

The importance of vitamin D to healing from multiple sclerosis

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The importance of vitamin D

 I consider diet to be important to how well a person deals with MS. I eat a diet full of fruits and vegetables. I avoid gluten because I am allergic to it. The national health institute, after a review of the literature, highlights the importance of vitamin D. In what follows, I will be discussing their findings from the abstract at
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/28507011/

Their findings emphasize the importance of vitamin D for MS people which is present and added to many foods including milk. Taking vitamin D supplements is recommended by neurolgists I know. You can also get vitamin D from the sun, because your body produces vitamin D when exposed to the sun. Moderation is key here because there is risk of increasing the chances of cancer if one gets sunburned or too much sun. Incidentally, vitamin D can also help one heal from sunburn, a full circle if you will.

Vitamin D is important because it is a potent modulator of the immune system. It is thought that getting enough vitamin D may prevent getting MS to some degree. It has long been noticed that people in northern latitudes, who get less sun and their bodies thus produce less vitamin D, are more likely to get MS.

The studies reviewed found that people with MS taking vitamin D were less likely to relapse and were less likely to have new lesions, the most significant marker of multiple sclerosis. Vitamin D improved brain lesions and improved walking speed, a significant indicator of the progression of the illness.

It has been found that MS people having a relapse typically have lower serum levels of vitamin D in their bodies, suggesting a preventative and possibly protective role for vitamin D in regard to multiple sclerosis. In any case, vitamin D should be an important vitamin to take through supplements because of its therapeutic effects. It is thought that it helps the MS body in its fight to repair MS damage.

To heal from MS, I believe one needs to use both alternative and medical approaches that are right for the person. You can see all the approaches I used in my book at
https://www.amazon.com/Multiple-Sclerosis-Mission-Remission-Healing-ebook/dp/B07D7JBZ5L/ref=mp_s_a_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1529367853&sr=8-2&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65&keywords=multiple+sclerosis+Mission+remission

500 medicines being developed for neurological conditions

_Trendwatch
100 million people in the United States, or nearly a third of people in the United States, suffer from a neurological condition of which multiple sclerosis is one. Alzheimers, Parkinsons, dementia, ALS, brain tumors and conditions, traumatic brain injuries, migraine headaches, MS, chronic pain, stroke damage, genetic disorders, and epilepsy are among the thousand neurological conditions counted.

Over 500 new medications are in pharmaceutical companies drug development pipelines to treat neurological problems. Over seventy percent represent a brand new or “first in class” treatment approach.

In multiple sclerosis, the new candidate focuses on myelin repair. Myelin covers nerve fibers and is like insulation that allows the nerve signal to travel faster without interruption. It would help new myelin to grow to repair damaged nerve fibers.

There is nothing like this now, as the major MS medications are focused on preventing the immune system from mistakenly attacking the myelin protective sheath over the nerve fibers. These misguided attacks on the nerve fibers and brain neurons are why MS is considered to be an autoimmune disease.

Many of the alternative, spiritual, exercise, and healthy living approaches described in my book could help many people battling with chronic disease. See
https://www.amazon.com/Multiple-Sclerosis-Mission-Remission-Healing-ebook/dp/B07D7JBZ5L/ref=mp_s_a_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1529367853&sr=8-2&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65&keywords=multiple+sclerosis+Mission+remission