Eggs, legumes, vegetables, fish and chicken in preventing and/or helping multiple sclerosis

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https://m.medicalxpress.com/news/2018-08-diets-high-vegetables-fish-multiple.html

Curtain University found th as t eating fish and vegetables may be less likely to contract multiple sclerosis. Specifically, legumes, fish, vegetables, poultry and egg consumption correlated with less risk of getting MS.

Smoking, glandular fevers, getting less sun, and low vitamin D intake are known to be associated with increased risk of contracting multiple sclerosis.

The Australian study studied the difference between a healthy diet consisting of the above healthy foods and a tragically flawed Western diet (which typically includes too much sugar and fat).

The study’s author, Dr. Black concluded that people eating a high amount of these healthy foods, like fish and vegetables, were fifty percent less likely to contract multiple sclerosis than people who ate a low amount of these foods.

The reference for this study is:
Lucinda J Black et al. A healthy dietary pattern associates with a lower risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination, Multiple Sclerosis Journal (2018). DOI: 10.1177/1352458518793524

Read about my miracle MS remission at

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The importance of vitamin D to healing from multiple sclerosis

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The importance of vitamin D

 I consider diet to be important to how well a person deals with MS. I eat a diet full of fruits and vegetables. I avoid gluten because I am allergic to it. The national health institute, after a review of the literature, highlights the importance of vitamin D. In what follows, I will be discussing their findings from the abstract at
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/28507011/

Their findings emphasize the importance of vitamin D for MS people which is present and added to many foods including milk. Taking vitamin D supplements is recommended by neurolgists I know. You can also get vitamin D from the sun, because your body produces vitamin D when exposed to the sun. Moderation is key here because there is risk of increasing the chances of cancer if one gets sunburned or too much sun. Incidentally, vitamin D can also help one heal from sunburn, a full circle if you will.

Vitamin D is important because it is a potent modulator of the immune system. It is thought that getting enough vitamin D may prevent getting MS to some degree. It has long been noticed that people in northern latitudes, who get less sun and their bodies thus produce less vitamin D, are more likely to get MS.

The studies reviewed found that people with MS taking vitamin D were less likely to relapse and were less likely to have new lesions, the most significant marker of multiple sclerosis. Vitamin D improved brain lesions and improved walking speed, a significant indicator of the progression of the illness.

It has been found that MS people having a relapse typically have lower serum levels of vitamin D in their bodies, suggesting a preventative and possibly protective role for vitamin D in regard to multiple sclerosis. In any case, vitamin D should be an important vitamin to take through supplements because of its therapeutic effects. It is thought that it helps the MS body in its fight to repair MS damage.

To heal from MS, I believe one needs to use both alternative and medical approaches that are right for the person. You can see all the approaches I used in my book at
https://www.amazon.com/Multiple-Sclerosis-Mission-Remission-Healing-ebook/dp/B07D7JBZ5L/ref=mp_s_a_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1529367853&sr=8-2&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65&keywords=multiple+sclerosis+Mission+remission

The Author Is Interviewed by Psychologist Dr. David Van Nuys

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I was interview #606 on psychologist Dr. David Van Nuys’ http://www.Shrinkrapradio.com
See

What is good for skin may be good for MS

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A study involving MS patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis was conducted at the Oregon Health and Science University. People who took lipoic acid had less brain atrophy. There was less brain tissue loss with people who used lipoic acid compared to a control group. The results were promising enough that phase 2 studies are being conducted regarding the safety and efficacy of lipoic acid.

This study caught my eye because I use alpha lipoic acid because it is good for skin. I wonder if the alpha lipoic acid that I have been taking for years was one of the many factors that sent my primary progressive multiple sclerosis into remission. I also take DMAE for skin, but know of no studies regarding its effect on MS.

I think many healthy practices can combine to help MS patients. For example, it is recommended that people drink 8 glasses of water per day (this is especially true in Arizona where I live). You can see the many healthy practices I used at https://www.amazon.com/Multiple-Sclerosis-Mission-Remission-Healing-ebook/dp/B07D7JBZ5L/ref=mp_s_a_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1529367853&sr=8-2&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65&keywords=multiple+sclerosis+Mission+remission

“Multiple Sclerosis Mission Remission: Healing MS against All Odds” is available in print and as an ebook

Available at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07D7JBZ5L/ref=cm_sw_r_fa_awdo_t1_.pDiBbVDAK0S4

What should my approach to having MS, multiple sclerosis, be?

What follows is my answer to a young man to the above question.

“I am going to give you a hopeful answer based on 26 years of living with this disease. I was on all the ABC-R medications, but continued to get steadily worse. By the time I had it for 10 years, it was evident that it was primary progressive multiple sclerosis by the intensity of the symptoms. I had a plastic brace the length of my right leg, numbness in arms and legs, used a four-point cane, and needed a wheelchair for anything like flying and going to the airport. If I ventured out to see sights like Las Vegas, I was able to see the sights only because kind relatives pushed me in a wheelchair.

Then the beginning of what I now call my “functional healing” started when I found an experimental treatment my neurologist at Barrow Neurological Institute agreed to do with me involving steroids and cytoxan. The whole thing is too complex to describe here as it was concurrent with I say about twenty other alternative treatments. This whole mix of Western medicine, Eastern approaches and methods, and generally healthy things to do is described in my latest book, “Multiple Sclerosis Mission Remission: Healing MS Against All Odds.”

The critical thing to know is that I believe MS is probably due to a large number of converging factors. Make medicine your base and aid it with alternative methods that do no harm and can do a lot of good. I still have MS, but MS does not have me. At this time, I have no major symptoms after 26 years, but that does not mean you stop taking the medicine. I continue to have Tysabri infusions every six weeks, am married, and have a full time private practice as a clinical psychologist.

It is an overwhelming diagnosis. Give yourself time and develop whatever spirituality you have. Medicine + alternative approaches + good relationships + spirituality + meaningful work was my personal formula to functional healing. Some part of that might be part of your solution. My book is really about some ways of finding what is right for you which will be personally unique.

My approach to living successfully with multiple sclerosis is described in my book “Multiple Sclerosis Mission Remission: Healing MS Against All Odds.”  It is available at https://www.amazon.com/Multiple-Sclerosis-Mission-Remission-Healing-ebook/dp/B07D7JBZ5L/ref=mp_s_a_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1529367853&sr=8-2&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65&keywords=multiple+sclerosis+Mission+remission